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Are Scottish Fold Cats Good With Dogs?

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Scottish Folds are unmistakable from most other breeds due to their signature floppy ears and cartoonish appearance. If you want to add one of these adorable cats to your family but already have a dog, you should read up on the breed.

Are Scottish Folds Good With Dogs?  Each cat is different, but Scottish Folds are typically tolerant of both children and other pets.  As long as they are introduced properly, Scottish Folds should get along very well with your dog.

Just like people, the younger a cat is when introduced to a change, the more easily they will accept it. Don’t be discouraged if you’re working with an older cat, though!

They, too, can adapt to change — It may just require a bit more patience. As long as you do your research, take precaution, and proceed slowly, your Scottish Fold and dog can be the best of friends!

HOW TO INTRODUCE A SCOTTISH FOLD TO YOUR DOG

The introduction process is not only vital to the long term success of your pets but could be a life or death situation when dealing with more powerful dogs.

It is easy to get excited about introducing your two furry friends, but it is critical that you never rush or force a meeting between the two!

  • When you first bring home the cat, make sure he has his own space with everything he needs, like food and water dishes, a litter box, and safe hiding space. If you would like to spend time with the cat, calmly sit in the same room with a book or other quiet activity.
  • Read the cat to determine the speed of your next step. If he’s hiding and keeping distance, you may want to leave the room, or at least not approach. If he’s playful and relaxed, you may consider making taking the next step. It’s best to give a cat a minimum of a day or two in his new space before introducing any pets.
  • Before going any further, you can help prepare both animals for the introduction by familiarizing them with each others’ scents. The easiest way to do this is to rub a washcloth on each pet, then let the other sniff. Take it up a notch by giving a treat to each pet while introducing the scent, creating a positive association.
  • The next logical step is to allow your cat to explore your home while the dog is completely contained. This could be accomplished by putting the dog in a crate, holding him on your lap, or putting a basket muzzle and leash on him.

While it’s highly unlikely, prepare as if the cat will approach your dog during this first full-house exploration session. In this scenario, make sure you can quickly remove the cat or dog from the situation if one is not responding well.

Also keep in mind that It is a natural response for dogs to be curious, which can be very threatening to a scared cat. Continuously reward your dog for looking at you, rather than obsessing over the cat.

Slowly progress to gating off a room or area of the house that only the cat can reach. This way, he can get away if feeling uncomfortable. Do not allow the dog to chase your cat. If this step goes badly, separate the animals as much as possible and try again on another day.

Remember, this process could take anywhere from one day to several months. Unfortunately, there is always the chance that the two may never get along. Once again, do not rush the meeting of your pets.

HOW CAN I MAKE SURE THAT MY SCOTTISH FOLD AND DOG GET ALONG?

Even if you think your pets are getting along well, there are a few ways you can help ensure long term success in their relationship

  • Safe Space – If possible, keep a space available for your cat that your dog can not reach. This could mean using a cat door leading to a basement or a baby gate in a doorway. Your cat will also appreciate perches like floating shelves or cat trees.
  • Training – Make sure your dog has mastered recall, so that if you want to separate him from your cat, you can do it quickly. Practice calling him to you during various levels of distraction.
  • Watch Body Language Closely – Be mindful that your cat may be enjoying a game one minute and be overwhelmed the next. If your cat and dog are engaged in rambunctious play, make sure you’re watching both for signs of stress.
  • Set Boundaries – Scottish Folds are extremely sweet and docile but are also not the most athletic of all breeds. Make sure that if your cat and dog are playing, they’re not pushing the cat’s limits too far. Break up the game with another activity before things can escalate.

Remember that no two cats or dogs are the same. You should always consult your veterinarian and use your best judgment when making important decisions about your pets.

HOW TO TELL IF YOUR DOG WILL BE FRIENDLY TOWARDS A NEW CAT

Before bringing home a Scottish Fold or any other cat, you should consider how your dog may respond. Similarly to cats, the breed of a dog may shape his personality traits but does not completely define him.

There is no way to know for certain how your dog will react, but you can get an idea from past experiences and tests.

While the size of your dog could increase the risk to the cat, simply by size difference, it is important that you do not rule out a small dog’s ability to hurt a cat.

Small terriers were bred not only to pursue animals but sometimes animals larger than themselves. Again, this does not mean your terrier is automatically a danger to cats- just be sure not to underestimate him.

Before taking your cat home, think about how your pup has previously reacted to other animals. When you’re in the back yard or out on a walk, does your canine go crazy for squirrels? Has your dog ever met a cat? How well did it go?

If you would like to see how your dog will react, find a friend with a cat and have your dog look from the other side of the window. You can also swing by an adoption center at pet stores, where cats are often in cages in a pet store.

Please give these cats at least 20 feet. They are already stressed under these circumstances and do not need further agitation from your pet.

As long as you feel like you’re not putting any animals in danger by bringing them into your home, you can work on your dog’s behavior as you go.

RELATED QUESTIONS

How much does a Scottish Fold Cat Cost? On Average, a Scottish Fold kitten ranges from $1,000 to $1,500. However, if you decide to adopt a Scottish Fold cat from another family or from a shelter, you can get them for a much lower price.

Do Scottish Folds shed a lot? Due to their long double coats, Scottish Folds shed most of the year. Their coats can also get matted more easily than other breeds and require regular grooming.

Do Scottish Folds have hearing problems? While the Scottish Fold does carry some health concerns in its genes, their hearing is generally normal. The cartilage deformity that causes their signature ear fold is also tied to arthritis-like conditions, which affect the quality of life, but not hearing.

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